• Mon. Apr 19th, 2021

Honduran: Giron-Amador Sentenced for Illegally Reentering

Honduran: Giron-Amador Sentenced for Illegally Reentering

Honduran Man, Giron-Amador Sentenced to Prison for Illegally Reentering the United States After Being Deported Five Times

Has Prior Felony Conviction for Illegally Reentering the United States

(STL.News) A man who illegally returned to the United States after being deported five times was sentenced yesterday to over one year in federal prison.

Carlos Antonio Giron-Amador, age 29, a citizen of Honduras illegally present in the United States and residing in Hampton, Iowa, received the prison term after a guilty plea on November 18, 2020, to one count of illegal reentry into the United States after having been deported following a conviction for a felony.

At the guilty plea, Giron-Amador admitted he had previously been deported from the United States and illegally reentered the United States without the permission of the United States government.  Giron-Amador was deported to Honduras from Texas in September 2011, May 2012, and May 2013.  In November 2016, Giron-Amador was convicted in the Iowa District Court for Franklin County for operating while intoxicated (OWI).  In March 2017, Giron-Amador was convicted in the Northern District of Iowa of illegally reentering the United States, a felony, and was deported a fourth time in May 2017.  In April 2018, Giron-Amador was convicted in Texas of illegally entering the United States, a misdemeanor, and deported a fifth time in September 2018. Giron-Amador most recently came to the attention of immigration agents in October 2020 following an arrest in Franklin County, Iowa, related to his earlier conviction for OWI.

Giron-Amador was sentenced in Cedar Rapids by United States District Court Chief Judge Leonard T. Strand.  Giron-Amador was sentenced to 13 months’ imprisonment.  He must also serve a three-year term of supervised release after the prison term.  There is no parole in the federal system.

Giron-Amador is being held in the United States Marshal’s custody until he can be transported to a federal prison.

SOURCE: USDOJ.Today